wonderous-world:

Shirakawago, Japan by Agustin Rafael Reyes
vacilandoelmundo:

Kiyomizu-dera, Kyoto, Japan
didiusz:

Kitsune | Personal Work

didiusz:

Kitsune | Personal Work

thecadaverousportrait:

An onryo (Japanese folklore) is a malevolent ghost which usually returns to the land of the living to right wrongs it experienced in past lives. Normally, they are women, although male onryo are not unheard of. Tormenting their former lovers and families brings the spirits great pleasure and they often drive the living to commit suicide. Onryo usually wait a few days—even a month in some cases—before starting their attacks on their relatives, because they want to see who is mournful and who isn’t.
An onryo is very similar to a go-ryo, which is another type of ghost in Japanese folklore which returns to attack the living, although a go-ryo is usually a person who comes from a noble or aristocratic family and usually dies a martyr’s death. Conversely, onryo are often created through some sort of trauma, like abuse from a husband, but their rage is usually non-specific, meaning they’ll attack family members who had nothing to do with their deaths. In fact, sometimes the murderer won’t even be punished by the onryo.

thecadaverousportrait:

An onryo (Japanese folklore) is a malevolent ghost which usually returns to the land of the living to right wrongs it experienced in past lives. Normally, they are women, although male onryo are not unheard of. Tormenting their former lovers and families brings the spirits great pleasure and they often drive the living to commit suicide. Onryo usually wait a few days—even a month in some cases—before starting their attacks on their relatives, because they want to see who is mournful and who isn’t.

An onryo is very similar to a go-ryo, which is another type of ghost in Japanese folklore which returns to attack the living, although a go-ryo is usually a person who comes from a noble or aristocratic family and usually dies a martyr’s death. Conversely, onryo are often created through some sort of trauma, like abuse from a husband, but their rage is usually non-specific, meaning they’ll attack family members who had nothing to do with their deaths. In fact, sometimes the murderer won’t even be punished by the onryo.

regurgitatedrebellion:

Funayūrei (“marine spirit”) are ghosts of people who have died at sea. They are sometimes depicted as scaly fish-like humanoids and some may even have a form similar to that of a mermaid or merman. They approach people on boats and ask to borrow a Hishaku (a utensil for scooping up water). If they are given a ladle, they will pour sea water into the boat until it sinks.

regurgitatedrebellion:

Funayūrei (“marine spirit”) are ghosts of people who have died at sea. They are sometimes depicted as scaly fish-like humanoids and some may even have a form similar to that of a mermaid or merman. They approach people on boats and ask to borrow a Hishaku (a utensil for scooping up water). If they are given a ladle, they will pour sea water into the boat until it sinks.

unexplained-events:

Rokurokubi
Found in Japanese folklore, they appear to look like normal human beings during the day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths.
Some legends say that the rokurokubi were once Buddhist who broke various precepts of Buddhism and were transformed into these demons. They are often sinister and feed off the blood of others who broke the precepts or human men.

unexplained-events:

Rokurokubi

Found in Japanese folklore, they appear to look like normal human beings during the day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths.

Some legends say that the rokurokubi were once Buddhist who broke various precepts of Buddhism and were transformed into these demons. They are often sinister and feed off the blood of others who broke the precepts or human men.

odditiesoflife:

The Aokigahara Suicide Forest

The Aokigahara forest has the unfortunate distinction as the world’s second most popular place to take one’s life. The first is the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Since the 1950s, depressed Japanese citizens have wandered in, and at least 1000 of them haven’t wandered out. In 2002, 78 bodies were found within the forest, exceeding the previous record of 74 in 1998. In 2003, the rate climbed to 100, and in recent years, the local government has stopped publicizing the numbers in an attempt to downplay Aokigahara’s association with suicide. In 2004, 108 people killed themselves in the forest. In 2010, 247 people attempted suicide in the forest, 54 of whom completed the act.

Japanese spiritualists believe that the suicides committed in the forest have permeated Aokigahara’s trees, generating paranormal activity and preventing many who enter from escaping the forest’s depths. Complicating matters further is the common experience of compasses being rendered useless by the rich deposits of magnetic iron in the area’s volcanic soil.

Due to the vastness of the forest, desperate visitors are unlikely to encounter anyone once inside the so-called “Sea of Trees,” so the police have mounted signs reading “Your life is a precious gift from your parents,” and “Please consult the police before you decide to die!” on trees throughout the forest.

The place has long been associated with death. Ubasute, literally translates to ”abandoning an old woman.” Ubasute may have been practiced there into the 19th century, and the forest is reputedly haunted by the Yurei (angry spirits) of those left to die.

didiusz:

TENGU

didiusz:

TENGU

pamandjapan:

化け草履 (Bakezori)
A Bakezori is straw zori sandal which has been transformed into a tsukumogami, a yokai which was once a household item. It runs through the house and chants “kararin, kororin, kankororin!”. It is said that it comes to life in a household where footwear is improperly treated. 

pamandjapan:

化け草履 (Bakezori)

A Bakezori is straw zori sandal which has been transformed into a tsukumogami, a yokai which was once a household item. It runs through the house and chants “kararin, kororin, kankororin!”. It is said that it comes to life in a household where footwear is improperly treated. 

ask-rad-hazard:

Mythological Creatures #47 (Your daily dose of myth history. It might save your life)
Today’s creature: Kuchisake Onna (In English Slit Mouth Woman)
Features: A Japanese woman wearing a kimono and a surgical mask, under the mask is the woman’s face with a slit on her mouth from ear to ear (The first version of the Joker from the batman movie?)
Source: Japanese Mythology
Habitat: Japan

Kuchisake Onna is a horrifying creature from Japanese legend. Kuchisake Onna is a woman with a surgical mask that would follow children around and ask them if they thought she was beautiful (Evil female Pedophile ghost now its official you have heard everything you are welcome). They all said yes because behind the mask she was indeed pretty. Next she would rip of her mask, which had been hiding knife scars that marked from her mouth too her ears. She will then scream in there face, “Am I pretty know?!”. If they said “No!” she would kill them, but if they say “yes” she will pull out a knife and give them the same scars (See Evil). One way to escape is to confuse Kuchisake Onna by answering her with “You are average” or ask her the same question to you: ”Am I pretty now?”. (In other words mess with her)
According to the old Japanese legend which began during the Heian period, Kuchisake Onna was a concubine of a samurai. When the samurai learn that her woman had been unfaithful to him he slit her mouth from ear to ear with his katana sword and said “Who will think you’re beautiful now?”. In the older version of Kuchisake Onna, she covered her face with her kimono. (Scary right?)

ask-rad-hazard:

Mythological Creatures #47 (Your daily dose of myth history. It might save your life)

Today’s creature: Kuchisake Onna (In English Slit Mouth Woman)

Features: A Japanese woman wearing a kimono and a surgical mask, under the mask is the woman’s face with a slit on her mouth from ear to ear (The first version of the Joker from the batman movie?)

Source: Japanese Mythology

Habitat: Japan

Kuchisake Onna is a horrifying creature from Japanese legend. Kuchisake Onna is a woman with a surgical mask that would follow children around and ask them if they thought she was beautiful (Evil female Pedophile ghost now its official you have heard everything you are welcome). They all said yes because behind the mask she was indeed pretty. Next she would rip of her mask, which had been hiding knife scars that marked from her mouth too her ears. She will then scream in there face, “Am I pretty know?!”. If they said “No!” she would kill them, but if they say “yes” she will pull out a knife and give them the same scars (See Evil). One way to escape is to confuse Kuchisake Onna by answering her with “You are average” or ask her the same question to you: ”Am I pretty now?”. (In other words mess with her)

According to the old Japanese legend which began during the Heian period, Kuchisake Onna was a concubine of a samurai. When the samurai learn that her woman had been unfaithful to him he slit her mouth from ear to ear with his katana sword and said “Who will think you’re beautiful now?”. In the older version of Kuchisake Onna, she covered her face with her kimono. (Scary right?)